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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,458 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason. professor, how would you describe syria's economy as far as its structure? >> guest: syria's economy went through a number of changes. it went from a centralized state hood economy to a mixed economy that involved centralized aspects and some market aspects, but not in the manner that actually allowed the market to be efficient at all. >> host: when did this change occur from centralized to mixed? >> guest: most of the countries, the late developing countries, after the post colonial development, they had a period where they actually had to involve the masses in order to gain support and legitimacy. when this process, for a variety of reasons, began to create problems for the regimes and power and when external support and pressure for some of the regimes and for some of the directions that were available at the time in terms of moving towards the market economy around the 1980s took place, you saw a lot of these third world regimes or the global house begin to move from a state centered economy to a more market oriented economy, and
, and that could change the world. there are a lot of questions, too. the sharing economy waits to be shaped by policy. it is in its adolescence. this is a transformative moment. it is waiting to be shaped by policy, but for whose benefit? we believe it should be shaped for the benefit of as many people as possible, and especially for those who need it the most. . we also need new regulations, not simply application of the old. otherwise, the sharing economy will fail to meet its promises. 30 of things that are the biggest threats to our society. i will open a panel -- there are two things i think are the biggest threats to our society. i will give you a high level brief of the sharing economy. there is no textbook definition of the sharing economy. we will then begin the panel discussion which will last for 45 minutes or an hour, however long you want it to last. before i dived in here, raise your hand if you are familiar with at least one of these books. i highly recommend all of them. the one on the end is coming out in may. "share or die" -- i do not recommend that for marketing, but for
on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the
to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the verge of discussing things that would invite other members of our city family, department heads, those who work in planning or land use, to be involved in an ongoing discussion that would potentially invite and open up our economy and modernize it even further. a year ago, david chiu and i did not know what the outcome might be, but we were afraid a company called twitter might leave our city and that thousands of jobs will leave this behind. we took a risk and suggested we might be able to revamp our tax code for the benefit of job creation. little did we know a year later, that invitation has caused over 125 companies to locate in our city, creating thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to re
economy can create those projects, or do we have to rely on residual benefits of bottom- up activity like reducing car use? >> the question is -- there are a lot of grassroots bottom-up activity, sharing resources, but there are also opportunities to take macro approaches like public transportation, for instance, and how we can get some of those opportunities going. >> i will take this. i think that is a really good question. i think there is a role both bottom-up and top down, and i think it is a conversation we're going to have in the working group to get these ideas that are coming from our community and from leaders in the space. there are so many ideas we may not be hearing. we are inviting all of you with some of these great ideas. i think it is the first set. obviously, it will not be easy to make some of these changes, but being part of the dialogue is very important. >> i would check out mesh labs, which looks at that pretty closely. who else? ok. >> [inaudible] i know a little bit about the cars and trucks, but i understand there might be some legislation that creates opportunit
the economy on both sides of the debate, and felt that it wanted to try my hand at clarifying it. i felt like i needed to make my contribution as best i could, because i done that at bain capital and felt like i need to try something different and it and i had to try to do something that was important. >> host: you mentioned of bain capital. there's a lot of interesting ideas and thoughts in this book. maybe you could tell me where these ideas come from. i these ideas that are developed over a long time from your career in finance? who are your influences in how you think about the economy and what's in the book? >> guest: they probably, it evolves from debates i had with young kids that came out of top schools, came to work for first been consulted and bain capital who wanted to argue economics and politics, and i can't think when you get to be 40 or 45, and i think it evolves from that. but i also benefited greatly from a friendship i had with bruce who is a professor at columbia who i was able to make the arguments to any would frankly say you're right on this but you're stepping on a land
under the obama administration the u.s. experienced a morbid of the infrastructure of the economy, the public sector become a manipulative force intervenes in the financial sectors with gowrn tee that attract talent and -- [inaudible] >> the worst this is the grain cast of the obama administration. and the epa now has a game control over [inaudible] has deemed a po lou assistant, danger to the environment. and co2 is the manhattan and keeps us alive. the circle of life and attempt to oppress co2 epitomizes the kind of antinature, antiimper prize spirit of the administration. it's the reason we need another supply side of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty." >> i would have changed quite a lot. i mean, there. all kind of detail that have changed. but i found that do try to change one thing would be to change everything. so, you know, you have in to a bunch of editorial work. instead of changing it, i essentially retained the old book and added 30,000 new words at the beginning and end. and revision of
. this morning, we're going to start our program with two speakers who will share information about the economy, the outlook for real estate and investing, and then we will hear from our mayors. it is a great time to be talking about the economy because it at least appears to be getting a little bit better, maybe in fits and starts. we are hearing some good news on the job front -- not nearly enough yet. i will just ask -- who does think that the economy in 2012 will actually be better than 2011? good. that is about maybe half. who thinks that we are lucky to be in the general climate for business and the regional economy? before we get to our program, i want to thank the organizations and people who made all this possible. i will say now, though, you may have questions that you would like our moderator to ask. if you would like to send them up early, there are index cards at your tables, so just hold your hands up high and somebody will come collect them and give them to our moderator. this event is jointly presented by san francisco business times and our title fund. you will soon hear from o
city initiatives -- you know, this -- the schering economy working group will interface with or connect with, and how does it fit in with existing strategic goals and plans of the city? >> i think our director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think about the economic impact of these new business models, it can contribute quite greatly to that. i am going to answer the question a little bit differently -- i have been inspired by this space considerably. there's a lot more opportunity. cars, so many assets we have in our society. as a city, we own buildings, cubicles, museums, golf courses, so much that we have -- >> yes, but it is our property, right? >> yes. that is a very good point. stewards of these resources, and they are often underutilized resources, so how do we improve access to those? there is a lot to learn from this that could be applied to the public comments. >> thank you. let's open it up. do we have a microphone for people to come to? ok, we will just it old school. if yo
century relations to new 21st century -- to the new 21st century economy. as the mayor said, new research and dialogue are needed. that is why the sharing economy working group and the panel today make so much sense. i want to add one more thing before we go to the panel discussion. these facts may be intellectually stimulating or inspiring, but they do not really speak honestly to my heart. this is what brought me to the sharing economy. what i was after was a new way to live in a way that i felt i could live fully. what excites me about sharing is how it changes every day like for the better. it empowers us. the economic shift in the new businesses of creating and exchanging value is creating a new cultural narrative. it is replacing an old legacy narrative that was toxic. it told us the go live comes from shopping and competition -- it told us the good life comes from shopping in competition, from being free from each other. we are leading ving this because it has pushed us to the brink of extinction. it has enslaved as to debt. it is boring. it is spiritually empty. there is
that helps business like other states than california, which raises taxes and takes money out of the economy and puts it into the government's hands, which is huge for a state like that and florida is getting its act in gear. >> what do the candidates have to learn from these governors? neither one of them has exactly the same policies. >> the first thing we can learn is five out of the 7 governors in the swing states are republicans. so, a lot of the macro republican policies seem to be working at the state level, and, rick talked about florida but look at wisconsin, scott had to go up against the recall to get collective bargaining with the unions, and, john kasich, the same in ohio and, he has gone out and had about 18 tax cut plans, he's straightened out the tax code in ohio and these are the types of things either presidential candidate needs to implement, going forward. to start creating jobs again. >> susan, john makes a good point, fighting unions and collective bargaining, going up against regulations. those are all things that seem to be working on the state level. should the candi
>>> violence plagues oakland. can tech come to the rescue? is the economy on track? the danger of making a big concept through simple metaphors. all of that with kari byron and others here on "press: here." >> good morning. when someone is shot to death, detectives know there will be many eyewitnesses but little cooperation, which is why oakland recently launched an unanimous tip by text system. >> open the door! open the door! >> the tip by text system allows anyone to send in information from a smartphone and for detectives to continue that conversation with the authenticated original tipster without ever knowing who it is. it's one of the products offered by a silicon valley startup with more than 4,500 police agencies as clients including lapd and santa cruz. it's more than just a tip line. it's also a communications system allowing law enforcement to send citizens alert by e-mail, by tweet, by text and by iphone app all localized by neighborhood. eric leu is from nixel. there is potential here to revolutionize the way people are police and the way police do their jobs beca
in britain, we're faced with the task of a new economy from the rubble of the old. the eurozone faces the biggest crisis since it was forme.d d. countries like indonesia and china grow in a phenomenal rate. the consequences in the shift in power -- should we fail to respond, cannot be overstated. our influence in the world -- our ability to fund the public services, and mantain our culture of openness. all of them are in the balance. power would move away from the liberal and democratic world, and within it, too. to moderates and hardliners, and those committed to the politics of cooperation and those hellbent on confrontation. if history taught us anything, it is that extremists thrive in tough times. iour country will pay a heavy political price. but the human cost will be higher, still. we would leave a trail of victims -- so to those who ask what we could do -- cutting public spending. who suffers most when governments go bust? when they can no longer pay salaries, benefits, and pensions. not the bankers or hedge fund managers. it is the poor, the old, the infirm. those with the l
. this is what brought me to the sharing economy. what i was after was a new way to live in a way that i felt i could live fully. what excites me about sharing is how it changes every day like for the better. it empowers us. the economic shift in the new businesses of creating and exchanging value is creating a new cultural narrative. it is replacing an old legacy narrative that was toxic. it told us the go live comes from shopping and competition -- it told us the good life comes from shopping in competition, from being free from each other. we are leading ving this because it has pushed us to the brink of extinction. it has enslaved as to debt. it is boring. it is spiritually empty. there is a news story being born in san francisco. it is one where the more you contribute to the common good, the more you are respected. the better you believe in committee, the more access to what you have -- the better you behave in a community, the more access you have. instead of judging each other, we help each other and realize our greatest potential. we open our world to each other. through doing that, we
to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are sharing with. we tried to encourage the parties to get to know each other, trying to just display your interest or so many things i can think of that our websites due to show who this person really is. they take their photo. i think part of this is about trust, and it is about letting -- the things we do to encourage trust and the things you do as a responsible member of the sharing community to insure you are doing your due diligence as well. when two people -- first off, the one example i want to bring is that a lot of our ca
and little optimism. >> the world economy recovery continues, but it has weakened further. in advanced economies, growth is now too little to make a substantial dent in unemployment. >> reporter: colleagues cut their forecasts for growth worldwide to 3.3% this year. the recovery has suffered new setbacks, they wrote. and uncertainty weighs heavily on the outlook. >> you can call it a general feeling of uncertainty about the future. worries about the ability of european policy makers that control the euro crisis. there are worries about the failure of u.s. policy makers to agree so far on a fiscal plan. >> reporter: he ran through a list of challenges in developed countries. government spending cuts, a weak financial system, high unemployment. emerging economies such as china drove the recovery from the global downturn, but they have cooled off. >> clearly the downside if the global economy were to slow much more than expected, then additional policy measures will be needed. >> reporter: he said he was encouraged by the easy money policies of many banks and pieces to what he called a co
of the first cities, i think the only city, and has put together a working group around the sharing economy. we are the epicenter in san francisco. we have a role to help nurture the emerging space. there is a lot of value to be created here. i am really excited to be part of the panel seeing all of these great people next to me. >> the people on the panel are going to tell us about their companies. let's come straight down the line. >> i am a co-founder and ceo of viable, a community marketplace for travel experiences. anybody can offer their services to others as a guide, offering touristrs, sailing ships, cookig class. we have enabled terrorism -- tourism to access parts of the city it had never before accessed. restoring murals for example. we launched in 2011. we have been going for about a year. we're proud to be launched in san francisco and growing the platform here. >> i am the founder of a company called task rabbit, an online marketplace for people to outsource jobs to others. if you need dry cleaning pickup or groceries delivered, you can post that job. one of our over 1000 active t
bit too strong. there are some small bubbles popping up in different parts of their economy, and they are trying to slow down the economy. slowing down an economy -- every government can do that. the hard part is controlling that downward trajectory. in most cases, countries that tried to slow down their economy -- they go into a crash, they go into a recession, but china is different. the best way i have to describe china's economy, to steal a line from yogi berra is one-half market economy and three- quarters centralize control economy. they are big enough. they are powerful enough that they can probably pull this off. we will have to see how it happens, but that is an important thing for the world economy. europe, on the other hand, is another story. if you believe in the mayan calendar that the world will end in 2012, europe might be the reason for it. it has an awful lot of problems going on. you read about the sovereign debt crisis in the news. that is one problem. that is probably the least problem that they have. the second problem they have is most of the banks are
in america with a strong economy. let's spending in washington with a balanced budget. energy independence and the repeal of obamacare. thank you for tuning in, and i'm confident at the end of this debate i was earned your vote on november 6 to go to washington as your member of congress, fighting for a bright future for our children and grandchildren. thank you. >> let's get right to the question. the first question i have is for the congresswoman. there's a new proposal to build a stadium and complex for the buffalo bills along the city's waterfront which is presented to the council on tuesday. the teams currently at the stadium expires in 2013. you think a downtown stadium after the proposal patient as a viable alternative? hochul: i've been intrigued by the idea. i'm not sure that's going to be the right location. we have to make sure it's get the least sign. certainly when chris collins is county executive is an opportunity put this to bed and resolve the but we are come down to the 11th hour now and we have to make sure that we take care of ensuring that the buffalo bills stay here i
an argument for economic freedom and talked about the difference between the real economy that mitt romney participated in and succeeded in and the solyndra economy of president where you fund favored enterprises. >> when we come back president obama revamps his stump speech, taking credit for recent positive signs in the economy. but is our outlook that rosy? our panel takes a closer look next. oo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. for a golf getaway. double miles you can actually use... but mr. single miles can't join his friends because he's getting hit with blackouts. shame on you. now he's stuck in a miniature nightmare. oh, thank you. but, with the capital one venture card... you can fly any airline, any flight, any time. double miles you can actually use. what's in your wallet? alec
is undergoing tremendous economic development. but some places struggle to integrate with the global economy. we continue our exploration of this region in china's fifth-largest city, shenyang. once a center of heavy industry, today its aging and outdated factories confront pressure to modernize and turn a profit in a market economy. here we explore the restructuring of state-run enterprises, the contrast between development in china's southeast and northeast regions and the human geography of a labor force facing massive layoffs with nowhere to go. ( train chugging ) steam locomotives like this one were once a common sight. today they have all but disappeared-- vanishing symbols of an earlier industrial era, an era that built the city of shenyang. once a commanding industrial center, this sprawling city, much like the steam locomotive, saw itself left behind by a modern world. shenyang is the nucleus of china's northeast region, called manchuria. abundant natural resources have long made this place attractive for industry: wood, coal and iron to fuel factories, plentiful rice production to feed
economic tigers and raw-material producers. state economies benefit from their relative location on the pacific rim, and multinational corporations take advantage of shipping opportunities offered by proximity to the world's largest ocean. we focus on the tiny city-state of singapore. despite being the smallest country in southeast asia and lacking natural resources, it is one of the wealthiest states in the world and the gateway to southeast asia. american computer giant hewlett-packard searched for a base to spearhead its push to asia. man: we basically stock and distribute hewlett-packard products, mainly computer-related products like pcs-- personal computers-- printers, plotters, scanners and all kinds of related peripherals for personal computers. and we distribute throughout the asia-pacific region, and that covers all the way from korea to india, down to australia. narrator: the company needed centralocation, but that alone wouldoteenough t. a number of cities could claim toe cad near the center of the thriving asian region. in the end, hewlett-packard chose the tiny isla
>> with just 10 days until it is time to pull the lever, the economy is not in full recovery mode. the president is pulling out a 20 page pamphlet that he said will bring the economy back. but if you look inside there is new spending from teachers and infrastructure and energy investments and it is a stimulus plan that will not work. so is this the right or wrong plan to get america working again? hi, everybody. welcome to forbes on fox and go with steve forbes and rick unger and elizabeth mcdonald and john. >> right or wrong policy for america? >> it is a doctor bleeding the patient. it will not cure the patient but make it worse. it takes resources and will cost jobs and every job created with that means two or fewer job private sector. that will not make the economy come back. >> rick, the new economic patriotism. does it mean i am unpatriotic if i don't agree with this. >> i don't think so. >> don't like patriotism with economic plan. >> if you are going to get behind the country you need to get behind some of the thing in the plan. most particularly i like the infrastructure
. but the election 12 days away, president obama was out hawking his new plan to its use the economy. since it is only a 20-page pamphlet it is hard to keep track of. >> my plan. [laughter] i found my plan. here is. gerri: no surprise there. no plan. if it is obama's last-minute ploy to distract voters that he has dropped the ball on the economy. obama can count on one of them and that is his own. the president voting early in his hometown of chicago the first time ever for a sitting president. my next guest is making sure he is not sitting in the white house for long. joining me now, former governor of new hampshire and senior adviser to the romney campaign. good to have you here, governor. appreciate your time. if the stock about the economy. i'm sorry? >> happy thursday. gerri: said the thursday to you as well. let's talk about the economy. i read this plan, and four of the president's top five points are points that governor romney made in his five. plant. it almost picks up the language verbatim. why should we believe the president is committed to this plan when the economy, we have se
a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: joseph stiglitz is a nobel prize winning economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society endangers our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today? and is it trending upwards? >> it's not really trending upward. i guess i would describe it as part of-- i call it a long slump, long malaise unless we do something. >> rose: right. >> you know there are two big gaps in our economy, relative to say 2007 before the crisis. one is real estate. real estate was the big sector, the bubble broke and now real-estate investment is half of what it was. no way that that is going to recover soon. the only good news is the houses were shodly onstructed and it may be 5 or 10 yea
nominee. while the editors praise president obama's early efforts to revitalize the economy through his stimulus plan, it concluded his record on the economy the past four years does not suggest he would lead in the direction the nation must go in the next four years. joining me now for the politics of weather and everything else is obama campaign senior advisor david axelrod. good morning, david. let me start here with the storm. when you look at virginia where this is likely to be the swing state most affected, does anything worry you about that state being more or less paralyzed by weather for a couple three, four days? >> well, the first thing i think we should say is we're most concerned about people. this storm could affect 50 million americans. the president has been in close contact with fema and dhs and all the agencies that have responsibility here to make sure we're doing everything we can for people, and that's what he is going to continue to do throughout this -- throughout this storm, and in terms of how it affects the election, i don't think anybody really knows. obviousl
. finish what he started. >> definitely the economy. single parent. so i am very concerned about the job growth. >> i want to vote for somebody i feel like i can trust. and i have confidence in. evening seems murky and tough to decide. undecided. completely undecided. >> i'm undecided. >> the debate will help. >> what do you care about? >> state is going in the wrong direction. get it going the other way. >> do you think colorado is a state that will do this? >> i think it will be close. >> bret: the first of three presidential debates will be held wednesday. just up the road from here at university of denver. for senior national correspondent john roberts is tonight. >> ahead of the debate. romney is shifting the focus under a withering critique from fellow republicans he is making the campaign less referendum on the president, more a choice between who has the best policies, to lead the nation in the future. >> i represent a different course. i make sure young people have great jobs tomorrow and bright and prosperous future. that is the difference between us. >> wednesday's debate will
benghazi but let that go. we're in the global economy that the new world order which was brought in by the first george bush signed into law by clinton so this is bipartisan, that is our economy and we wrote the rules as far as a global economy for the world to follow and now others are following it. so when we talk about shipping jobs overseas and things of that nature, that is the game. we can't move the goal post, we wrote the rules. and i'll close on the great city of detroit, when we talk about the bailout and which way it should go or bain capital. people have to realize, they have to understand that most of general motors jobs are now presently overseas and the head of general motors who took all the money is now crying that 7.5 million in pay is not enough. the united auto workers are still at entry level being hired in at over $19 an hour that's their pay but their total compensation with healthcare and bonuses comes out to $55 an hour. host: talk to us about the economic situation particularly in mecklenburg county and in charlotte which is a big banking center. guest:
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,458 (some duplicates have been removed)